Daily Market Update – January 25, 2016

 

 

 

Daily Market Update – January 25, 2016 (9:00 AM)

The week gets off to its start once again being led by the price of oil, which is again sinking.

After about a 23% increase in the price in just a couple of days, you can’t blame people for taking short term profits, especially as there was no real news to account for the rise in price, other than perhaps having been in a really oversold condition.

That’s not good enough to sustain a move.

The good news is that the stock market is still following the oil market, it’s not doing so in a big way.

Maybe that’s because traders are still snowed in somewhere, even though things should be reasonably back to normal and you don’t really need to leave your house to trade.

I’m not too anxious to do much of anything this week. I certainly don’t want to chase the late week gains, but I’d be happy to commit some money if I thought those gains were going to be more than just transient ones, as has been the case for the past 2 months.

There are some potentially big market movers this week with an FOMC announcement and the latest GDP report, but it’s really anyone’s guess what the FOMC will say in light of the less than robust economic activity since rates were raised and there’s no clue as to what GDP may look like after a lackluster holiday sales season.

What’s also a big question mark is how any news would be greeted. Will good news be bad or will it be good?

That’s more than enough uncertainty to keep me on the sidelines awaiting some kind of meaningful feeling of where things are headed.

What we do have this week are some big earnings announcements.

So far, no one has been bowled over by the first 2 weeks of those, but maybe some good news from the likes of Apple and Microsoft could give markets some reason to be optimistic about what may be in our future.

For one, I just hope that there is a reason to have that optimism and get back on a path of some trading activity.

Last week was just horrible in not having made any trades at all.

At least this week has a number of ex-dividend positions to generate some income, but ultimately, it’s trades that drive the ship.

.

.



Dashboard – January 25 – 29, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

SELECTIONS

MONDAY:   Oil down 3% to start the morning and guess what? Stocks are down too, but not as much as they have been lately when oil has tanked

TUESDAY:   The 10 Year Treasury below 2% again. Who would have imagined that? At least oil is flat this morning as are the futures, after yesterday’s large loss in pursuit of lower oil

WEDNESDAY:  Yesterday’s great gains are more or less holding in the pre-open futures session, as we await an FOMC Statement release today, that some expect will open door for more interest rate increases this year. But where is the data?

THURSDAY:  Shanghai down another 3% overnight, making it 25% for 2016. Yesterday’s plunge here was nothing more than an erasure of the previous day. This morning ha a small bounce in the futures, but it is a big day for earnings, although as I’ve said on any number of previous quarters, the economy is much more than Facebook

FRIDAY:. Could it possibly be? The futures are pointing decently higher after yesterday’s recovery and higher close, just like the last 2 days of the previous week. We’ll see.

 

 

 

 

 



 

                                                                                                                                           

Today's TradesCash-o-Meter

 

 

 





 “SNEAK PEEK AT NEXT WEEK” APPEARS ON FRIDAYS

Sneak PeekPie Chart Distribution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weekly Summary

  

Weekend Update – January 24, 2016

With the early part of the Republican primaries having focused on one candidate’s hair, it reminded me of that old complaint that people sometimes made that their hair had a mind of its own.

For better or worse the political hair jokes have pretty much finally run their course as the days tick down to a more substantive measure of a candidate’s character and positions on more weighty matters.

While it was nice seeing some gains for the week and finally having some reason to not curse 2016, there’s no mistaking the reality that the stock market hasn’t had much of a mind of its own after the first 14 trading days of the new year.

Bad hair days would have been a lot easier to take than the bad market days that have characterized much of the past  6 weeks.

The combination of China and the price of oil have led the market down and up on a daily basis and sometimes made it do flips during the course of a single trading day.

With the price of oil having climbed about 23% during the week from its multi-year lows, the market did what it hadn’t been able to do in 2016 and actually put together back to back daily gains. Maybe it was entirely coincidental that the 48 hours that saw the resurgence in the price of crude oil were the same 48 hours that saw the market string consecutive gains, but if so, that coincidence is inescapable.

While that’s encouraging there’s not too much reason to believe that the spike in the price of oil was anything more than brave investors believing that oil was in a severely over-sold position and that its recent descent had been too fast and too deep.

That pretty much describes the stock market, as well, but what you haven’t seen in 2016 is the presence of those brave souls rushing in to pick up shares in the same belief.

Of the many “factoids” that were spun this week was that neither the DJIA nor the NASDAQ 100 had even a single stock that had been higher in 2016. That may have changed by Friday’s closing bell, but then the factoid would be far less fun to share.

Instead, oil has taken the fun out of things and has dictated the direction for stocks and the behavior of investors. If anything, stocks have been a trailing indicator instead of one that discounts the future as conventional wisdom still credits it for doing, despite having put that quality on hiatus for years.

That was back when the stock market actually did have a mind of its own. Now it’s more likely to hear the familiar refrain that many of us probably heard growing up as we discovered the concept of peer pressure.

“So, if your best friend is going to jump out of the window, is that what you’re going to do, too?”

With earnings not doing much yet to give buyers a reason to come out from hiding, the coming week has two very important upcoming events, but it’s really anyone’s guess how investors could react to the forthcoming news.

There is an FOMC announcement scheduled for Wednesday, assuming that the nation’s capital is able to dig out from under the blizzard’s drifts and then the week ends with a GDP release.

With a sudden shift in the belief that the economy was heading in one and only one direction following the FOMC’s decision to increase interest rates, uncertainty is again in the air.

What next week’s events may indicate is whether we are back to the bad news is bad news or the bad news is good news mindset.

It’s hard to even make a guess as to what the FOMC might say next week.

“My bad” may be an appropriate start with the economy not seeming to be showing any real signs of going anywhere. With corporate revenues and unadulterated earnings not being terribly impressive, the oil dividend still not materializing and retail sales weak, the suggestion by Blackrock’s (BLK) Larry Fink last week that there could be layoffs ahead would seem to be the kind of bad news that would be overwhelmingly greeted for what it would assuredly represent.

When the FOMC raised interest rates the market had finally come around to believing that a rise in rates was good news, as it had to reflect an improving economic situation. If the next realization is that the improving situation would last for only a month, you might think the reception would be less than effusive.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in the Traditional, Double Dip Dividend, Momentum or “PEE” categories.

Last week was the first week since 2008 or 2009 that I made no trades at all and had no ex-dividend positions. No new positions were opened, nor were any call or put rollovers executed.

Other than a few ex-dividend positions this week, I’m not certain that it will be any different from last week. I haven’t opened very many new positions of late, having to go back nearly 2 months for a week with more than a single new position having been opened.

Unlike much of the past 6 years when market pullbacks just seemed like good times to get good stocks at better prices, the past few months have been offering good prices that just kept getting better and better.

If you had been a buyer, those better and better prices were only seen that way by the next series of prospective buyers, who themselves probably came to bemoan how less they could have paid if only they waited another day or two. 

The gains of the final two days of last week make me want to continue the passivity. Anyone having chased any of those precious few days higher lately has ended up as disappointed as those believing they had picked up a bargain.

At some point it will pay to chase stocks higher and at some point it will pay to run after value.

I’m just not convinced that two days of gains are enough to  signal that value is evaporating.

The biggest interests that I have for the week are both earnings related trades. Both Apple (AAPL) and Facebook (FB) report earnings this week.

If you’re looking for a stock in bear market correction over the past 6 months, you don’t have to go much further then Apple (AAPL). Along with some of his other holdings, Apple has punished Carl Icahn in the same manner as has been occurring to mere mortals.

Of course, that 21% decline is far better than the 27% decline fro just a few days ago before Apple joined the rest of the market in rally mode.

Interestingly, the option market doesn’t appear to be pricing in very much uncertainty with earnings upcoming this week, with an implied move of only 6.2%

Since a 1% ROI can only be achieved at a strike level that’s within that range, I wouldn’t be very excited in the sale of out of the money puts prior to earnings. The risk – reward proposition just isn’t compelling enough for me. However, if Apple does drop significantly after earnings then there may be reason to consider the sale of puts.

There is some support at $90 and then a few additional support levels down to $84, but then it does get precarious all the way down to $75.

Apple hasn’t been on everyone’s lips for quite a while and we may not get to find out just how little it has also been on people’s wrists. Regardless, if the support levels between $84 and $90 are tested after earnings the put premiums should still remain fairly high. If trying this strategy and then faced with possible assignment of shares, an eye has to be kept on the announcement of the ex-dividend date, which could be as early as the following week.

While Apple is almost 20% lower over the past 6 months, Facebook has been virtually unchanged, although it was almost 30% higher over the past year.

It;s implied move is 6.8% next week, but the risk – reward is somewhat better than with Apple, if considering the sale of puts prior to earnings, as a 1% ROI for the sale of a weekly option could be obtained outside of the range defined by the option market. As with Apple, however, the slide could be more precarious as the support levels reflect some quick and sharp gains over the past 2 years.

For those that have been pushing a short strategy for GameStop (GME), and it has long been one of the most heavily of shorted stocks for quite some time, the company has consistently befuddled those who have had very logical reasons for why GameStop was going to fall off the face of the earth.

Lately, though, they’ve had reason to smile as shares are 45% lower, although on a more positive note for others, it’s only trailing the S&P 500 by 2% in 2016. They’ve had some reasons to smile in the past, as well, as the most recent plunge mirrors one from 2 years ago.

As with Apple and Facebook, perhaps the way to think about any dalliance at this moment, as the trend is lower and as volatility is higher, is through the sale of put options and perhaps considering a longer time outlook.

A 4 week contract, for example, at a strike level 4.6% below this past Friday’s close, could still offer a 3% ROI. If going that route, it would be helpful to have strategies at hand to potentially deal with an ex-dividend date in the March 2016 cycle and earnings in the April 2016 cycle.

One of the companies that I own that is going ex-dividend this week is Fastenal (FAST). I’ve long liked this company, although I’m not enamored with my last purchase, which I still own and was purchased a year ago. As often as is the case, I consider adding shares of Fastenal right before the ex-dividend date and this week is no different.

What is different is its price and with a 2 day market rally that helped it successfully test its lows, I would be interested in considering adding an additional position.

With only monthly options available, Fastenal is among the earliest of earnings reporters each quarter, so there is some time until the next challenge. Fastenal does, however, occasionally pre-announce or alter its guidance shortly before earnings, so surprises do happen, which is one of the reasons I’m still holding shares after a full year has passed.

In the past 6 months Fastenal has started very closely tracking the performance of Home Depot (HD). While generally Fastenal has lagged, in the past 2 months it has out-performed Home Depot, which was one of a handful of meaningfully winning stocks in 2015.

Finally, Morgan Stanley (MS) is also ex-dividend this week.

Along with the rest of the financials, Morgan Stanley’s share price shows the disappointment over the concern that those interest rate hikes over the rest of the year that had been expected may never see the light of day.

This week’s FOMC and GDP news can be another blow to the hopes of banks, but if I was intent upon looking for a bargain this week among many depressed stocks, I may as well get the relationship started with a dividend and a company that I can at least identify the factors that may make it move higher or lower.

Not everything should be about oil and China.

 

Traditional Stocks: none

Momentum Stocks:  GameStop

Double-Dip Dividend: Fastenal (1/27 $0.30), Morgan Stanley ($0.15)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings:  Apple (1/26 PM), Facebook (1/27 PM)

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may become actionable – most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts – in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The overriding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week, with reduction of trading risk.

 

Weekend Update – January 24, 2016

With the early part of the Republican primaries having focused on one candidate’s hair, it reminded me of that old complaint that people sometimes made that their hair had a mind of its own.

For better or worse the political hair jokes have pretty much finally run their course as the days tick down to a more substantive measure of a candidate’s character and positions on more weighty matters.

While it was nice seeing some gains for the week and finally having some reason to not curse 2016, there’s no mistaking the reality that the stock market hasn’t had much of a mind of its own after the first 14 trading days of the new year.

Bad hair days would have been a lot easier to take than the bad market days that have characterized much of the past  6 weeks.

The combination of China and the price of oil have led the market down and up on a daily basis and sometimes made it do flips during the course of a single trading day.

With the price of oil having climbed about 23% during the week from its multi-year lows, the market did what it hadn’t been able to do in 2016 and actually put together back to back daily gains. Maybe it was entirely coincidental that the 48 hours that saw the resurgence in the price of crude oil were the same 48 hours that saw the market string consecutive gains, but if so, that coincidence is inescapable.

While that’s encouraging there’s not too much reason to believe that the spike in the price of oil was anything more than brave investors believing that oil was in a severely over-sold position and that its recent descent had been too fast and too deep.

That pretty much describes the stock market, as well, but what you haven’t seen in 2016 is the presence of those brave souls rushing in to pick up shares in the same belief.

Of the many “factoids” that were spun this week was that neither the DJIA nor the NASDAQ 100 had even a single stock that had been higher in 2016. That may have changed by Friday’s closing bell, but then the factoid would be far less fun to share.

Instead, oil has taken the fun out of things and has dictated the direction for stocks and the behavior of investors. If anything, stocks have been a trailing indicator instead of one that discounts the future as conventional wisdom still credits it for doing, despite having put that quality on hiatus for years.

That was back when the stock market actually did have a mind of its own. Now it’s more likely to hear the familiar refrain that many of us probably heard growing up as we discovered the concept of peer pressure.

“So, if your best friend is going to jump out of the window, is that what you’re going to do, too?”

With earnings not doing much yet to give buyers a reason to come out from hiding, the coming week has two very important upcoming events, but it’s really anyone’s guess how investors could react to the forthcoming news.

There is an FOMC announcement scheduled for Wednesday, assuming that the nation’s capital is able to dig out from under the blizzard’s drifts and then the week ends with a GDP release.

With a sudden shift in the belief that the economy was heading in one and only one direction following the FOMC’s decision to increase interest rates, uncertainty is again in the air.

What next week’s events may indicate is whether we are back to the bad news is bad news or the bad news is good news mindset.

It’s hard to even make a guess as to what the FOMC might say next week.

“My bad” may be an appropriate start with the economy not seeming to be showing any real signs of going anywhere. With corporate revenues and unadulterated earnings not being terribly impressive, the oil dividend still not materializing and retail sales weak, the suggestion by Blackrock’s (BLK) Larry Fink last week that there could be layoffs ahead would seem to be the kind of bad news that would be overwhelmingly greeted for what it would assuredly represent.

When the FOMC raised interest rates the market had finally come around to believing that a rise in rates was good news, as it had to reflect an improving economic situation. If the next realization is that the improving situation would last for only a month, you might think the reception would be less than effusive.

As usual, the week’s potential stock selections are classified as being in the Traditional, Double Dip Dividend, Momentum or “PEE” categories.

Last week was the first week since 2008 or 2009 that I made no trades at all and had no ex-dividend positions. No new positions were opened, nor were any call or put rollovers executed.

Other than a few ex-dividend positions this week, I’m not certain that it will be any different from last week. I haven’t opened very many new positions of late, having to go back nearly 2 months for a week with more than a single new position having been opened.

Unlike much of the past 6 years when market pullbacks just seemed like good times to get good stocks at better prices, the past few months have been offering good prices that just kept getting better and better.

If you had been a buyer, those better and better prices were only seen that way by the next series of prospective buyers, who themselves probably came to bemoan how less they could have paid if only they waited another day or two. 

The gains of the final two days of last week make me want to continue the passivity. Anyone having chased any of those precious few days higher lately has ended up as disappointed as those believing they had picked up a bargain.

At some point it will pay to chase stocks higher and at some point it will pay to run after value.

I’m just not convinced that two days of gains are enough to  signal that value is evaporating.

The biggest interests that I have for the week are both earnings related trades. Both Apple (AAPL) and Facebook (FB) report earnings this week.

If you’re looking for a stock in bear market correction over the past 6 months, you don’t have to go much further then Apple (AAPL). Along with some of his other holdings, Apple has punished Carl Icahn in the same manner as has been occurring to mere mortals.

Of course, that 21% decline is far better than the 27% decline fro just a few days ago before Apple joined the rest of the market in rally mode.

Interestingly, the option market doesn’t appear to be pricing in very much uncertainty with earnings upcoming this week, with an implied move of only 6.2%

Since a 1% ROI can only be achieved at a strike level that’s within that range, I wouldn’t be very excited in the sale of out of the money puts prior to earnings. The risk – reward proposition just isn’t compelling enough for me. However, if Apple does drop significantly after earnings then there may be reason to consider the sale of puts.

There is some support at $90 and then a few additional support levels down to $84, but then it does get precarious all the way down to $75.

Apple hasn’t been on everyone’s lips for quite a while and we may not get to find out just how little it has also been on people’s wrists. Regardless, if the support levels between $84 and $90 are tested after earnings the put premiums should still remain fairly high. If trying this strategy and then faced with possible assignment of shares, an eye has to be kept on the announcement of the ex-dividend date, which could be as early as the following week.

While Apple is almost 20% lower over the past 6 months, Facebook has been virtually unchanged, although it was almost 30% higher over the past year.

It;s implied move is 6.8% next week, but the risk – reward is somewhat better than with Apple, if considering the sale of puts prior to earnings, as a 1% ROI for the sale of a weekly option could be obtained outside of the range defined by the option market. As with Apple, however, the slide could be more precarious as the support levels reflect some quick and sharp gains over the past 2 years.

For those that have been pushing a short strategy for GameStop (GME), and it has long been one of the most heavily of shorted stocks for quite some time, the company has consistently befuddled those who have had very logical reasons for why GameStop was going to fall off the face of the earth.

Lately, though, they’ve had reason to smile as shares are 45% lower, although on a more positive note for others, it’s only trailing the S&P 500 by 2% in 2016. They’ve had some reasons to smile in the past, as well, as the most recent plunge mirrors one from 2 years ago.

As with Apple and Facebook, perhaps the way to think about any dalliance at this moment, as the trend is lower and as volatility is higher, is through the sale of put options and perhaps considering a longer time outlook.

A 4 week contract, for example, at a strike level 4.6% below this past Friday’s close, could still offer a 3% ROI. If going that route, it would be helpful to have strategies at hand to potentially deal with an ex-dividend date in the March 2016 cycle and earnings in the April 2016 cycle.

One of the companies that I own that is going ex-dividend this week is Fastenal (FAST). I’ve long liked this company, although I’m not enamored with my last purchase, which I still own and was purchased a year ago. As often as is the case, I consider adding shares of Fastenal right before the ex-dividend date and this week is no different.

What is different is its price and with a 2 day market rally that helped it successfully test its lows, I would be interested in considering adding an additional position.

With only monthly options available, Fastenal is among the earliest of earnings reporters each quarter, so there is some time until the next challenge. Fastenal does, however, occasionally pre-announce or alter its guidance shortly before earnings, so surprises do happen, which is one of the reasons I’m still holding shares after a full year has passed.

In the past 6 months Fastenal has started very closely tracking the performance of Home Depot (HD). While generally Fastenal has lagged, in the past 2 months it has out-performed Home Depot, which was one of a handful of meaningfully winning stocks in 2015.

Finally, Morgan Stanley (MS) is also ex-dividend this week.

Along with the rest of the financials, Morgan Stanley’s share price shows the disappointment over the concern that those interest rate hikes over the rest of the year that had been expected may never see the light of day.

This week’s FOMC and GDP news can be another blow to the hopes of banks, but if I was intent upon looking for a bargain this week among many depressed stocks, I may as well get the relationship started with a dividend and a company that I can at least identify the factors that may make it move higher or lower.

Not everything should be about oil and China.

 

Traditional Stocks: none

Momentum Stocks:  GameStop

Double-Dip Dividend: Fastenal (1/27 $0.30), Morgan Stanley ($0.15)

Premiums Enhanced by Earnings:  Apple (1/26 PM), Facebook (1/27 PM)

Remember, these are just guidelines for the coming week. The above selections may become actionable – most often coupling a share purchase with call option sales or the sale of covered put contracts – in adjustment to and consideration of market movements. The overriding objective is to create a healthy income stream for the week, with reduction of trading risk.

 

Week in Review – January 18 – 22, 2016

 

Option to Profit

Week in Review

 

JANUARY 18 – 22, 2016

 

NEW POSITIONS/STO NEW STO ROLLOVERS CALLS ASSIGNED/PUTS EXPIRED CALLS EXPIRED/PUTS ASSIGNED CLOSED EX-DIVIDEND
0  /  0 0 0 0   /   0 1   /   0 0 0

 

Weekly Up to Date Performance

January 18 – 22,  2016


Maybe the secret to having a gain in 2016 is just not being open to trade all 5 days of a week.

Afer another bad start to the week there was something that we haven’t seen in a long while.

Consecutive gaining sessions and big ones, at that.

But this was the first week since early 2009 that I mad absolutely no trades.

I can’t recall whether there has been a week in the time frame or longer that also didn’t have a single ex-dividend position, either.

But that was this week. Nothing, nothing at all.

The themes for 2016 are pretty obvious.

It’s almost embarrassing just how tightly the market and oil are correlated. While China is a theme, too, there’s no escaping the incredibly tight tandem moves of oil and stocks as they continue to defy their normal relationship.

Oil moves and the market moves in the same direction and has been doing just that for more than a year at this point and yet it still seems so bizarre.

This week, though, for a change, that meant that in the latter half of the week the market went higher. Hard to believe, but the price of oil actually went up on the week,

It might have had gone even higher earlier in the week, but the strong advance by oil, which ha sent the market strongly higher, reversed itself.

You can probably guess what the market did at that point. It gave up its big gain on the day, just as had oil.

There wasn’t much reason to support the nearly 20% gain in the price of a barrel of oil for the week other than the price had been beaten down so much and so fast.

Ultimately, that’s not a very good reason to keep iy going higher, so I’m not expecting too much as next week gets ready to begin and we get back to 5 days of trading.

Still, it was nice to end the week with the S&P 500 moving about 1.6% higher, especially since 2016 had already seen a 10% decline on the year.

Since that 10% decline came during the course of only 11 days of trading, it’s plausible that the entire loss can be offset just as quickly, but what would be the catalyst for supporting that kind of rally?

That’s hard to say, unless earnings can have some kind of meaningful turnaround from where they have been going.

With still very little cash in reserve and absolutely no positions set to expire next week, there are at least some ex-dividend positions.

But I don’t expect to be an active participant when it comes to adding any new positions during the week.

Since it has been a while since a few positive days have been strung together, I’ll have to see the proof before spending any money.

I would definitely much rather, though, see the market continue going higher and get a chance to find any uncovered positions to sell a call upon.

There were a few times this past week that I thought that was going to happen, but it just wasn’t there.

Maybe next week will be different, but it will take a lot of those different kind of weeks to make up for the damage done in just the first 2 weeks of the year.


.

This week’s details may be seen in the Weekly Performance spreadsheet * or in the PDF file, as well as in the summary below

(Note: Duplicate mention of positions reflects different priced lots):



New Positions Opened:  none

Puts Closed in order to take profits:  none

Calls Rolled over, taking profits, into the next weekly cycle: none

Calls Rolled over, taking profits, into extended weekly cycle:  none

Calls Rolled over, taking profits, into the monthly cycle: none

Calls Rolled Over, taking profits, into a future monthly cycle:  none

Calls Rolled Up, taking net profits into same cyclenone

New STO:  none

Put contracts expired: none

Put contracts rolled over: none

Long term call contracts sold:  none

< sp an style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: medium;">Calls Assigned: none

Calls Expired:  BAC

Puts Assigned:  none

Stock positions Closed to take profits:  none

Stock positions Closed to take losses: none

Calls Closed to Take Profits: none

Ex-dividend Positions  none

Ex-dividend Positions Next Week: F (10/27 $0.15), FAST (1/27 $0.3), KMI (1/28 $0.125(

For the coming week the existing positions have lots that still require the sale of contracts:   AGQ, ANF, AZN, BBBY, BBY, CHK, CLF, COH, CSCO,  CY, DOW, FAST, FCX, GDX, GM, GPS, HAL, HFC, HPQ, INTC, IP, JCP, JOY, KMI, KSS, LVS, MCPIQ, MOS, NEM, RIG, WFM, WLTGQ, WY (See “Weekly Performance” spreadsheet or PDF file)



* If you don’t have a program to read or modify spreadsheets, you can download the OpenOffice Suite at no cost.



Daily Market Update – January 22, 2016

 

 

 

Daily Market Update – January 22, 2016 (7:30 AM)

The Week in Review will be posted by 10 PM and the Weekend Update will be posted by Noon on Sunday.

The following trade outcomes are possible today:

Assignments:   none

Rollovers:   none

Expirations:  BAC

The following were ex-dividend this week:  none

The following will be ex-dividend next week: F (1/27 $0.15), FAST (1/27 $0.30), KMI (1/28 $0.125)

Trades, if any, will be attempted to be made prior to 3:30 PM EST



Daily Market Update – January 21, 2016 (Close)

 

 

 

Daily Market Update – January 21, 2016 (Close)

There was an impressive 300 point gain yesterday, but unfortunately it followed a 550 point loss earlier in the trading session.

So the day finally ended being about 250 points lower.

Today was another day of big swings, but it ended up with a decent gain, just as it looked like the gains in the futures were going to lead to another plunge after the first 30 minutes or so of trading.

If you’re keeping track it is starting to feel like 2008 and 2009 when people didn’t want to keep track and reportedly weren’t even opening their brokerage statement mailings each month.

If you are keeping track it’s really amazing that after nearly 3 weeks of trading in 2016 every single DJIA and NASDAQ 100 stock is lower on the year.

For its part Japan’s Nikkei Index is in bear correction territory and I don’t even know if there’s a word to describe the Chinese markets.

Meanwhile, the S&P 500 was down 10% on the year as the morning was about to get underway and was now  about 14% below its all time high and about 12% below its December high.

Today’s gain helps, but not too much. What would help would be stringing a few of these gains together.

The turn of economic events hasn’t really been an issue, at least not in the United States as a reason to account for what it is that we’re seeing.

Continued shock from China’s economy and its stock markets, together with oil just going lower and lower is a really potent combination, but US companies aren’t helping themselves with their earnings reports, so far.

The expectations were for lower earnings, but as those expectations have become reality, the response has still been surprise.

It’s difficult to compare favorably to the past few years when so many companies were buying up their own shares as their prices were going higher and higher. Without the same kind of purchasing not only will EPS reports not move any higher as the share float decreases, but also there isn’t an underlying support mechanism for price with corporate buying drying up.

Just as in 2008 and 2009, just when you would think that it would make sense for companies to start buying up their shares when they were relatively cheap, the money has often been used up in buying sprees at just the wrong time.

So that catalyst is gone for now and it looks like earnings won’t be that catalyst either.

At the moment it looks hard to identify what would lead price higher, much less substantively higher.

With China and oil leading the way down, unless they reverse course, they would still be a potent offset to anything that could sent markets higher.

People had for years been saying that the growth being reported in China was illusory, with lots of growth coming from infrastructure projects, such as building new cities, that had no possibility of ever becoming productive in their own rights.

So it may be a while before China becomes a positive for US markets unless some real tangible consumer led growth starts coming to life.

Oil, on the other hand, while still a supply and demand driven commodity, briefly showed some life a couple of weeks ago, when for a few hours it spiked as there were rumors of potential Saudi and Iranian conflict.

That may be what it takes for oil to get going again in any meaningful kind of way.

So 2016
may be a very long and frustrating year ahead and if Larry Fink is correct and employment rates drop, it will be a tumultuous year all around.



Daily Market Update – January 21, 2016

 

 

 

Daily Market Update -January 21, 2016 (7:30 AM)

There was an impressive 300 point gain yesterday, but unfortunately it followed a 550 point loss earlier in the trading session.

So the day finally ended being about 250 points lower.

If you’re keeping track it is starting to feel like 2008 and 2009 when people didn’t want to keep track and reportedly weren’t even opening their brokerage statement mailings each month.

If you are keeping track it’s really amazing that after nearly 3 weeks of trading in 2016 every single DJIA and NASDAQ 100 stock is lower on the year.

For its part Japan’s Nikkei Index is in bear correction territory and I don’t even know if there’s a word to describe the Chinese markets.

Meanwhile, the S&P 500 is down 10% on the year and is now  about 14% below its all time high and about 12% below its December high.

The turn of economic events hasn’t really been an issue, at least not in the United States as a reason to account for what it is that we’re seeing.

Continued shock from China’s economy and its stock markets, together with oil just going lower and lower is a really potent combination, but US companies aren’t helping themselves with their earnings reports, so far.

The expectations were for lower earnings, but as those expectations have become reality, the response has still been surprise.

It’s difficult to compare favorably to the past few years when so many companies were buying up their own shares as their prices were going higher and higher. Without the same kind of purchasing not only will EPS reports not move any higher as the share float decreases, but also there isn’t an underlying support mechanism for price with corporate buying drying up.

Just as in 2008 and 2009, just when you would think that it would make sense for companies to start buying up their shares when they were relatively cheap, the money has often been used up in buying sprees at just the wrong time.

So that catalyst is gone for now and it looks like earnings won’t be that catalyst either.

At the moment it looks hard to identify what would lead price higher, much less substantively higher.

With China and oil leading the way down, unless they reverse course, they would still be a potent offset to anything that could sent markets higher.

People had for years been saying that the growth being reported in China was illusory, with lots of growth coming from infrastructure projects, such as building new cities, that had no possibility of ever becoming productive in their own rights.

So it may be a while before China becomes a positive for US markets unless some real tangible consumer led growth starts coming to life.

Oil, on the other hand, while still a supply and demand driven commodity, briefly showed some life a couple of weeks ago, when for a few hours it spiked as there were rumors of potential Saudi and Iranian conflict.

That may be what it takes for oil to get going again in any meaningful kind of way.

So 2016 may be a very long and frustrating year ahead and if Larry Fink is correct and employment rates drop, it will be a tumultuous year all around.



Daily Market Update – January 20, 2016 (Close)

 

 

 

Daily Market Update -January 20, 2016 (Close)

Yesterday was just another in a series of nothing but disappointments in 2016.

But what in the world do you say about today?

It was a day that the DJIA came back from its lows by 300 points, yet still finished the day 250 points lower.

What looked like it might be a good gain for the day yesterday, with the market following oil decidedly higher, turned into wasting a 200 point gain as oil decided to turn lower.

While the DJIA closed up slightly higher, it was clear that it wasn’t done following the path of oil, which has had nothing to make anyone think that it was going to head higher anytime soon.

With Iranian oil now coming on line and no one looking as if they’re going to cut back on production, there is really going to be a glut of the stuff and no one’s economy is stepping in to use the cheap stuff as an excuse to ramp up anything.

This morning, as oil was again down sharply, it was not too surprising that the market was continuing in the same path.

This morning, the futures were down nearly 300 points and just adding more misery to what 2016 has already been for most everyone.

Yesterday’s turnaround was pretty stunning, but not in a good way It’s getting hard to envision what, besides a sustained increase in the price of oil could lead to an equally sustained move higher in US stock markets.

Today’s turnaround was pretty stunning, too, but in a far better way.

With China still continuing to be a mess and with no one really knowing what the depth of that mess really is and with some of the belief that our own market could have another 10% downside ahead of it and could be a harbinger for some layoffs, you really have to wonder what the FOMC is thinking and what they will do, if anything.

While most came to the realization that having an interest rate increase would be a good thing, as it would have reflected the need to gently tap the brakes on a growing economy, now comes the realization that maybe the FOMC should have waited for some real tangible evidence of that growth.

With market psyches so fragile, it’s not to certain that they could then see an FOMC action to again reduce rates as anything but really bad news for the economy and therefore for company earnings and stock valuations.

Most people, even those who may be value hunters haven’t been biting at stocks at these lower price levels.

Yesterday was another good example of why it has been a mistake to do so as the market was headed higher. Those climbs have been very transitory for the past 2 months and have only led to more disappointment except for those who may have been very, very short term oriented,

The moves have been on a dime, as yesterday showed and even when thinking that a new position was in the clear, all it has taken is to turn away from the screen for a few minutes and to see that optimism get replaced by gloom.

That’s not a very healthy market and it seems so bizarre to want to see the price of oil climb higher and to want to see interest rates do the same.

When was the last time you lived in a world like that?



Daily Market Update – January 20, 2016

 

 

 

Daily Market Update -January 20, 2016 (7:30 AM)

Yesterday was just another in a series of nothing but disappointments in 2016.

What looked like it might be a good gain for the day, with the market following oil decidedly higher, turned into wasting a 200 point gain as oil decided to turn lower.

While the DJIA closed up slightly higher, it was clear that it wasn’t done following the path of oil, which has had nothing to make anyone think that it was going to head higher anytime soon.

With Iranian oil now coming on line and no one looking as if they’re going to cut back on production, there is really going to be a glut of the stuff and no one’s economy is stepping in to use the cheap stuff as an excuse to ramp up anything.

This morning, as oil is again down sharply, it’s not too surprising that the market is continuing in the same path.

This morning, the futures are down nearly 300 points and just adding more misery to what 2016 has already been for most everyone.

Yesterday’s turnaround was pretty stunning. It’s getting hard to envision what, besides a sustained increase in the price of oil could lead to an equally sustained move higher in US stock markets.

With China still continuing to be a mess and with no one really knowing what the depth of that mess really is and with some of the belief that our own market could have another 10% downside ahead of it and could be a harbinger for some layoffs, you really have to wonder what the FOMC is thinking and what they will do, if anything.

While most came to the realization that having an interest rate increase would be a good thing, as it would have reflected the need to gently tap the brakes on a growing economy, now comes the realization that maybe the FOMC should have waited for some real tangible evidence of that growth.

With market psyches so fragile, it’s not to certain that they could then see an FOMC action to again reduce rates as anything but really bad news for the economy and therefore for company earnings and stock valuations.

Most people, even those who may be value hunters haven’t been biting at stocks at these lower price levels.

Yesterday was another good example of why it has been a mistake to do so as the market was headed higher. Those climbs have been very transitory for the past 2 months and have only led to more disappointment except for those who may have been very, very short term oriented,

The moves have been on a dime, as yesterday showed and even when thinking that a new position was in the clear, all it has taken is to turn away from the screen for a few minutes and to see that optimism get replaced by gloom.

That’s not a very healthy market and it seems so bizarre to want to see the price of oil climb higher and to want to see interest rates do the same.

When was the last time you lived in a world like that?